MemoryWorks
2017 Aging & Memory Conference
The Costs of Growing Old in Maine
Catherine Kaczorowski, Ph.D
Press Release October 18, 2016

Catherine Cook Kaczorowski, Ph.D., a neuroscientist who works to identify early causative events that underlie cognitive deficits associated with normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease, has been appointed a Jackson Laboratory assistant professor.

Kaczorowski’s research seeks to identify and understand how genetic factors and misregulated membrane proteins in the hippocampus of aging and AD mouse models alter hippocampal neuron excitability, functional connectivity of hippocampal neural networks, and memory. She uses multidisciplinary approaches that combine systems genetics with innovative high-resolution and high-throughput membrane proteomics, viral-based gene transduction approaches, behavioral assays, in vitro brain slice electrophysiology and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in freely behaving mice.

She joins the JAX faculty from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, where she was an assistant professor in the department of anatomy and neurobiology. After earning her B.A. in psychology from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, she obtained her Ph.D. in neuroscience at the Northwestern University Institute for Neuroscience, followed by postdoctoral appointments at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee and the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Catherine Kaczorowski, Ph.D Laboratory My research focus is to identify early causative events that underlie cognitive deficits associated with ‘normal’ aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Using multidisciplinary approaches that combine systems genetics with innovative high resolution and high throughput membrane proteomics, viral-based gene transduction approaches, behavioral assays, in vitro brain slice electrophysiology and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in freely behaving mice, my research seeks to identify and understand how genetic factors and misregulated membrane proteins in the hippocampus of aging and AD mouse models alter hippocampal neuron excitability, functional connectivity of hippocampal neural networks, and memory.

System Genetics to Identify Modifiers of Alzheimer’s Disease
Goal: The main goal of our project is to identify new genes that may modify the age at which a person will develop symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), termed “age-at-onset.” Another goal is to establish how these modifier genes influence brain cell networks necessary for proper memory function, which may point to new therapeutic targets to delay or even prevent AD’s onset.

Catherine has 22 publications - see NIH PubMed


The Jackson Laboratory The Jackson Laboratory
National Institute On Aging Funds New Alzheimer’S Disease Center At Indiana University And The Jackson Laboratory